èit

practice of placing quartz stones in moorland streams so that they would sparkle in moonlight and thereby attract salmon to them in the late summer and autumn (Gaelic)

grumma

mirage caused by mist or haze rising from the ground (Shetland)

doofers

horse poop (Scots)

sgombair

old grass found around the edges of lochs after storms and used as bedding for cattle (Gaelic)

fizmer

rustling noise produced in grass by petty agitations of wind (East Anglia)

fub

long withered grass on old pastures or meadows (Galloway)

plim

to swell with moisture (Cotswolds)

slunk

muddy or marshy land (Scots)

zam-zody

soft, damp, wet (Exmoor)

weepy

when land is full of springs (Exmoor)

borbhan

purling or the murmur of a stream (Gaelic)

threeple, tripple

gentle sound made by a quick-flowing stream (incessant chattering, monotony and repetition being implied) (Cumbria)

pudge

little puddle (Northamptonshire)

pulk

small dirty pool (Essex)

after-drop

raindrop which falls after a cloud has passed

beggar's-balm

froth collected by running streams in ditches, or in puddles by the roadside (Northamptonshire)

cockle

ripple in water caused by wind (Exmoor)

dimmity

twilight (Devon)

dark hour

interval between the time of sufficient light to work or read by and the lighting of candles — therefore a time of social domestic conversation (East Anglia)

glouse

strong gleam of heat from sunshine (East Anglia)

pink

like a candle, star, etc: to shine with a faint or wavering light, to glimmer, to twinkle (southern England)

shepherd's lamp

first star that rises after sunset (Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire)

crool

to huddle miserably together from cold (herefordshire)

knit up

when a bird fluffs up feathers in response to cold (Herefordshire)

urp

cloud; 'urpy' means cloudy with very large clouds (kent)

whiffle

when wind comes in unpredictable gusts (Kent)

cop

bank of earth on which a hedge grows (Cumbria)

boodge

to stuff bushes in a hedge to confine livestock (Herefordshire)

lunkie

hole deliberately left in a wall for animals to pass through (Scots)

moocher

potato, left in the ground, which sprouts again (Herefordshire)

fozie

when turnips are not good; spongy (Northern Ireland)

frail

leaf skeleton (Banffshire)

fairy butter, witches' butter, star jelly

yellow gelatinous substance found on rotten wood or timber, once thought to have dropped from the sky (Herefordshire, Northamptonshire)

spronky

when a plant or tree has many roots (Kent)

awm

steam rising from the bodies of cattle (Lincolnshire)